Founded in 2003 in Mona, Jamaica, the principal goal of the CPA is to support the free exchange of ideas and foster an intellectual community that is representative of the diversity of voices and perspectives that is paradigmatic of, but not limited to, the Caribbean. The Caribbean is thus understood not solely as a geopolitical region, but as a trope to investigate dimensions of the multiple undersides of modernity. Likewise, philosophy is conceived, not as an isolated academic discipline, but as rigorous theoretical reflection about fundamental problems faced by humanity. Understood in this way, Caribbean philosophy is a transdisciplinary form of interrogation aiming to elucidate fundamental questions that emerge with discovery, conquest, racial, gender, and sexual domination, genocide, dependency, and exploitation as well as freedom, emancipation, and decolonization.

CPA 2021 

Shifting the Geography of Reason XIX

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

  

  

 

Black Lives Matter: Black American Resistance Through Thought

June 18–19, 2021

Online Conference

To view this call as PDF, please click here.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 30, 2021

 

The year 1501 was the time when the first Africans were deported as enslaved people to the colony of Hispaniola from Spain. By 1503, they were being deported directly from the African continent with a long-lasting escalation of the slave trade as of 1518 when the first asiento was officially contracted. The enslavement of Africans never went without fierce resistance as testified by the first African rebellion reported in the Spanish plantations in 1521.

 

African resistance efforts to humanicide in the New World is undeniable. They were countless and took many forms the most salient of which was the Haitian Revolution of 1791–1804.

 

Since 1501, African life in the Americas from south through north has been founded on constant vigilance for resistance against multiform oppression. Today, social, economic, cultural and racial prejudice are still factors for Black people’s resistance in all corners of the Americas. Perhaps the May 25th, 2019 public killing of African American George Floyd at the hands of official authorities in the United States best embodies the contemporary challenges facing African-descended people in the entire American region. The present COVID-19 pandemic is another parameter stressing the pressures endured by Black communities in many parts of the world.

 

The Caribbean Philosophical Association calls for papers to be presented at its Shifting the Geography of Reason XIX online conference that highlight the ways, through cultural and thought production, Africans, during the enslavement period and their descendants during and after the enslavement period, have faced the challenges posed by colonization and enslavement and their consequences to assert that life and Black life matter.

 

We will grant preference to papers directly anchored in the question of Black resistance in the Americas through thought while also accepting proposals considering the CPA’s global principle of “Shifting the Geography of Reason.”

 

While there is no conference fee this year for this online conference, participation to the conference is contingent on formal membership to the Caribbean Philosophical Association. To become a member of the association, register at this site: https://www.pdcnet.org/cpa/Caribbean-Philosophical-Association-(CPA).


Guidelines: Please submit your individual and panel proposals by April 30th, 2021 via email to caribphilconference@gmail.com. Include the full name, paper title, abstract, institutional affiliation, preferred contact information, and rank or work (e.g., “writer” or “artist” if not an academic) of each potential participant in English, French, Spanish, Creole, or Portuguese.

 

Length of individual presentation: Each presenter reads for 15 minutes.

 

Instructions for individual and panel abstracts:

 

Individual abstracts: Abstracts contain the presenter’s name, institution – when this applies – and email address. It should also bear a title and a maximum of 150 words.

 

Abstracts for panels: Panels are made up with at least three presenters and a maximum of four.

 

The chair of the panel submits all abstracts in one single Word doc. file on behalf of her or his fellow panelists.  Each abstract contains a maximum of 150 words. Each individual abstract should start with the presenter’s name, the presenter’s title, institution of affiliation and email address. In addition to her or his individual abstract, the chair of the panel submits an abstract for the panel containing the panel’s title and abstract of a maximum of 150 words.